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A Conversation About Suicide Prevention

Thank you for joining us!

Thank you to those who joined us and participated in

A CONVERSATION ADDRESSING YOUTH SUICIDE

YES CEO David W. Downing and special guest Kevin Hines enjoyed answering attendee questions and learning more from each other. We hope you found the event insightful, educational, and empowering.

Kevin Hines: How to start a conversation with your child

Watch this clip from the event of special guest Kevin Hines, answering the question “How do you start a conversation about suicide with your child?”

Due to contractual obligations, we are not able to share a complete recording.

Unable to Attend?

Educational community programs such as this critical conversation addressing youth suicide are made possible by the generous donations from advocates like you. Please consider making a donation to YES today to support children and youth who are struggling with suicidal thoughts, and to keep conversations like this going.

 

 

Additional Resources

Teen Suicide Prevention Resource Guide

Continue being a lifeline to the young people in your life by sharing this resource guide with your family and friends. It includes a list of warning signs, conversation starters, intervention strategies and resources for parents and teens.

Youth Suicide Awareness & Prevention Infographic

We designed the YES Youth Suicide Infographic for you, to help build awareness and inspire action. Learn the facts about youth suicide, the warning signs, how to ask whether a child has considered suicide, and what to do if that answer is yes.

Talk to Me Video: How to Talk to Youth About Mental Health

YES asked the advice of students in the Lake Washington and Bellevue School Districts how they would like adults to talk to them about suicide and mental wellness. It also includes tips from YES counselor Michelle Brode on how to have those conversations.

 

In-Person and virtual services are available.

We help youth, ages birth to 22, and their families in East King County with: depression, substance use, grief, trauma, cultural, gender, and sexual identity issues, anxiety, ADHD, eating disorders, self-harming behaviors, and many other challenges.
If you’re a teen, a caring friend, parent, or a concerned adult, and these challenging times are particularly difficult for you or a young person you know, you can reach out to YES for help and learn about the different services we offer.
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